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Harrisburg Area Geological Society

HAGS The purpose of the Harrisburg Area Geological Society (HAGS) is to stimulate geologic thought, advance and disseminate geologic knowledge, and provide fellowship amongst area individuals interested in earth sciences. Monthly meetings (at GTS Technologies at 441 Friendship Road in Harrisburg) present a realm of geologic topics, ranging from tectonics, coal, carbonate groundwater geochemistry, Martian geomorphology, engineering geophysics, nuclear waste repositories, and ore mineralogy. Field trips allowed members to visit geologic sites within and beyond Pennsylvania. All events are open to the public and free unless otherwise stated. Meetings are at GTS Technologies, 441 Friendship Rd, Harrisburg, PA 17111. They occur at 6:30 PM on the second Thursday of the month, except summer months.   Officers: President- Kent Littlefield- KENT.V.LITTLEFIELD@leidos.com Vice-president- Bill Bruck- wbruck49@gmail.com Treasurer-Mike Meyer- mike.meyer.geo@gmail.com Secretary- Amy Randolph- secretaryhags@gmail.com  

 Up coming events :

 

Beyond the Stony Veil: Reconstructing the Earth’s Earliest Large Animal Traces via Micro-computed Tomography X-ray Imaging

Presented by:  Dr. Mike Meyer, Professor of Earth System Science at Harrisburg University (also HAGS’s Treasurer)

 

 

 

When:     Thursday September, 13, 2018

Time:       6:30 PM

 Where:    AEG Offices 441 Friendship Road, Harrisburg, PA 

Abstract: Trace fossils are superb lines of evidence for examining the ancient biologic world since they offer an opportunity to record something non-physical in the fossil record; the behavior of organisms. However, traces can be difficult to deconstruct from their matrix, which leads to the loss of important morphological and behavioral data. This is especially true for the earliest marine animal traces from the Ediacaran Period (635–541 million of years ago), which are usually small (<5 mm in diameter), simple (mostly small horizontal trails and burrows), and are sometimes difficult to be distinguished from co-existing tubular body fossils. The discovery of the relatively large traces of Lamonte trevallis from the Ediacaran Shibantan Member of the Denying Formation (~551–541 Ma) in the Yangtze Gorges area of South China provides a unique opportunity to study early bioturbators. These trace fossils are large enough and have sufficient compositional contrast (relative to the matrix) for in situ analysis via X-ray computed tomography and microcomputed tomography. Using these analytical methods, this study found new behaviors and ecological niches in these early trace makers. Additionally, it found that these early animals may have facilitated a strong geochemical gradient across the sediment-water interchange and affected Earth system cycles.

Speaker Bio:  Mike is a professor of Earth System Science at Harrisburg University in the emerging Earth and Environmental Science Program. He has is PhD from Virginia Tech (Blacksburg, VA), Masters from University of South Florida (Tampa, FL), and Bachelors from Beloit College (Beloit, WI). He enjoys field work, both domestically (in Appalachia and the Harrisburg area) and internationally (China and Namibia). He has a background in the material sciences and enjoys using advanced analytical equipment (such as SEM, FIB, or CT scans) on paleontological specimens. Originally from the northwest suburbs of Chicago, he now lives in Landisville, PA with his wife, two daughters, a cat, and a tank of glowing fish.

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  October 11, 2018Tom Gray, P.E., TetraTech – Rare Earth Elements in Coal

November 8, 2018Muhammed Babar, P.G. and Mike Knight, P.G., Gannett Fleming – Geological Mapping of Qatar (partnership between Gannett Fleming and USGS)   HAGS

 

Guidebooks, available for purchase, $5 each, plus $2 S7H. Multiple books may have discounted shipping.

1st Annual Field TripGeology in the South Mountain area, Pennsylvania, Noel Potter, Jr., editor, April 24, 1982, Reprinted 1992. 37 p. $5.00 plus $2.00 S&H.

2nd Annual Field Trip‐ Geology along the Susquehanna River, south‐central Pennsylvania, J. Ronald Mowery, editor, April 16, 1983, 55 p. $5.00 plus $2.00 S8H.

3rd Annual Field Trip‐ Stratigraphy, structural style, and economic geology of the York‐Hanover Valley, G. Robert Ganis and David Hopkins, April 28,1984, 51 p. $5.00 plus $2.00 S&H.

4th Annual Field Trip‐ Pennsylvania’s polygenetic landscape, William D. Sevon, April 27, 1985, Reprinted 1992, 55 p. $5.00 plus $2.00 S&H.

5th Annual Field Trip‐ Selected geology of Dauphin and Northumberland Counties, Pennsylvania, by W. D. Sevon, W. E. Edmunds, G. R. Ganis, and J. P. Wilshusen, May 17, 1986, 22 p. $5.00 plus $2.00 S&H.

6th Annual Field Trip‐ Lower Jurassic diabase and the Battle of Gettysburg, D. T. Hoff, J. R. Mowery, and G. R. Ganis, April 25, 1987,17 p. plus appendices. $5.00 plus $2.00 S&H.

7th Annual Field Trip‐ The geology of the Lower Susquehanna River area, a new look at some old answers, Glenn H. Thompson, Jr., editor, May 7,1988, 56 p. $5.00 plus $2.00 S&H.

8th Annual Field Trip‐ Karst development and environmental geology in the carbonate rocks of the Lehigh and Lebanon Valleys, William E. Kochanov, April 29, 1989, 33 p. $5.00 plus $2.00 S&H.

In cooperation with the 20th annual Binghamton Geomorphology Symposium at Dickinson College‐The rivers and valleys of Pennsylvania, then and now, by William D. Sevon, October 20, 1989, 59 p. $5.00 plus $2.00 S&H.

10th Annual Field Trip‐ The Ridge and Valley Physiographic Province and the East Broad Top Railroad, William D. Sevon, June 1, 1991, 24 p. $5.00 plus $2.00 S&H. 1

1th Annual Field Trip‐ Paleozoic geology of the Paw Paw‐Hancock area of Maryland and West Virginia, Marcus M. Key and Noel Potter, Jr., May 9,1992, 25 p. $5.00 plus $2.00 S&H.

12th Annual Field Trip‐ South Mountain and the Triassic in Adams County, Pennsylvania, Raymond Britcher, editor, May 22, 1993, 41 p. $5.00 plus $2.00 S&H.

13th Annual Field Trip‐ Geology of the Lebanon Valley and western end of the Reading Prong, Charles Scharnberger, editor, April 23. 1994, 68 p. $5.00 plus $2.00 S&H.

15th Annual Field Trip‐ Pseudo‐Morainic Topography of the Allentown Area of Eastern Pennsylvania, Duane D. Braun and William E. Kochanov, May 4, 1996, 28 p. $5.00 plus $2.00 S&H.

16th Annual Field Trip‐ Notes on the Hamburg Klippe: biostratigraphy, ash layers, olistostromes, and “exotics,” G. Robert Ganis, April 26, 1997, 52 p. $5.00 plus $2.00 S&H

17th Annual Field Trip‐ Geomorphology in the Northern Cumberland Valley, PA, including the Carlisle Deluge of 1779, Noel Potter, Jr., Donald Hartman, and Helen Delano, April 18, 1998, 49 p, $5.00 plus $2.00 S&H.

18th Annual Field Trip‐ The Cove Syncline by canoe, William M. Roman and Michael A. Knight, May 15, 1999, 16 p. plus maps, Out of Print

19th Annual Field Trip‐ Geology of the Kishacoquillas Valley and vicinity, Mifflin County, Pennsylvania, Michael A. Knight and William M. Roman, May 20, 2000, 18 p. plus maps and sections, $5.00 plus $2.00 S&H.

20th Field Trip‐ Geology and Geomorphology of the South Mountain Area, Cumberland and Franklin Counties, Pennsylvania, Noel Potter, Jr., and William D. Sevon, May 14, 2011, 64 p., $5.00 plus $2.00 S&H.

21st Field Trip‐ Shermans Creek from Dellville to Duncannon, Perry County, Pennsylvania, William Roman, May 12, 2012, 48 pages, color, $5.00 plus $2.00 S&H.

22nd Field Trip‐ Some geological aspects of the north side of the Cumebrland Valley in Cumberland County, PA, Bill Sevon, May 4, 2013, 33 pages, large font, color photos, $5.00 plus $2.00 S&H.   No formal guidebooks were prepared for the 9th (1990) and 14th (1995) Field Trips. The 2001 trip was a repeat of the 2000 trip.